The place to learn about your Mac. Tips and tutorials for novices and experts.

Code Mojo


Using CPAN to Extend Perl on Mac OS X

So you read Getting Started with Perl on Mac OS X and you're starting to write little Perl scripts to get things done. You learned a few things along the way, and even though you've surely hit some speed bumps, you're still rearing to go. Today, let's talk about extending your abilities by installing some modules from CPAN.



What is CPAN?

Getting Started with Perl on Mac OS X

Perl is a widely used programming language developed by Larry Wall in the late 1980's. Since being originally written as a scripting language to assist in system administration tasks, it has taken off as a popular language for doing everything from low-level systems programming to website scripting. If you have ever thought about getting into programming on your Mac, Perl is a great place to start!

Preparing for Perl

Reposition Windows for Multiple Monitors with AppleScript

If you frequently switch between different displays, you know organizing your windows when switching displays can be a real pain. I use my MacBook Pro frequently by itself, and I also have a 20" external display on my desk at home. Additionally, I have a weird affliction of window placement OCD. Admiring Stay, but not prepared to spend $15, I wrote the following AppleScript that will resize and organize my windows when I switch my display configuration.

Create Sitemaps with SiteOrbiter

Websites are getting larger and larger, and keeping track of them as they evolve can be a hassle. If you're a web developer, you'll want to create what's called a site map, a special file that lists all of the pages of your website in an hierarchical order. This file can be submitted to search engines to help them index your website. But how the heck are you supposed to create one on your Mac?

Set Up a Wireless Captive Portal Server

What does a captive portal server, also called a NAC (Network Access Control) do? It can sandbox any wireless connection until some form of authentication is provided. These servers are used in many cafes and public places that offer wireless internet. For example, when you try to connect to the wireless network at Starbucks, it will force your web browser to the same page - no matter what URL you enter. Until you authenticate, you can't go anywhere on the Internet.

Create a Web Development Environment With MAMP

Those of us who have websites know that we need a development environment to work on new features, make changes, and just experiment. If you're creating static HTML pages, you don't need much - you can create the pages on your Mac and preview them locally in your web browser or a with WYSIWYG application like iWeb. However, things are a bit more complicated if you're working with web applications that use PHP and MySQL.

Software Piracy: Black Beard & Captain Kidd!

In keeping with a recent article about piracy in the Runtime Revolution Newsletter, I've chosen to reprint an article I wrote in 2000 for the original Macinstruct website. It is still quite relevant and on target. Last week's Code Mojo article presented me with significant issues - more than I had originally thought - but I will be back next week reviewing some of the scripting that was done in the Coloring Book application.
-Joe


Rolling a Revolution Application

We left off last week with having pretty much completed a completely new Revolution stack, named the "San Diego Activities and Coloring Book." There were still a number of issues and more than a few scripting challenges to be resolved. I had assumed, somewhat naively, that the balance of the scripts would not be a great deal different than their HyperCard counterparts. As I dug in to completing them, I found that was not exactly to be the case.

Creating a New Cross-Platform Application in Revolution

When I first started thinking about this Chapter, I lost focus and started thinking about knowing all there is to know about Revolution. That was naive, and pretty stupid of me. I had exposed myself to a little bit of the vastness of Revolution and started thinking in grander terms than my original conception, which was to provide the old HyperCard crowd a really good excuse to shift their long-standing HC devotion to Revolution by demonstrating that Revolution can be a fairly simple extension to their HyperCard addiction. That group, on a worldwide basis, was - and is - huge.

Converting HyperCard Stacks to Standalone Apps Using Revolution

First of all, I want to say that my recent voyages into the land of Revolution have started taking their toll on me. Something that I, simplistically, had thought I was "up to" as a challenge in teaching has started to become far more. I'm not giving up; I just need to set the record straight: I'm a beginner, just like many of you who are reading my offerings, and my tenet "the best way to learn is by teaching" still remains in place. I just want everyone to know that I'm no expert on Revolution. I'm stumbling through exactly as I initially said I would be.

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