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Code Mojo

Convert a HyperCard Stack to Revolution

I had every intention of responding to readers' comments about my last column on Revolution, and I'm going to do just that; but we're also going to start with some serious Revolution activity after I make a few corrections to my previous offerings. Thanks to several of the RevList members, it was brought to my attention that I made a couple of erroneous observations and remarks.

What Can Be Done Using Revolution?

Since this column is going to be an evaluation and, hopefully, a guide to using Revolution to assist you in solving your problems, the very first thing we need to do is cover some of the most important general programming tenets.

Why Would Ordinary People Want to Program?

Last week's article was supposed to have been labeled a "Prelude"; hence this one is the real introduction, but first a short note about the responses I received from the first article.

Introducing Revolution: The New HyperCard

First a little nostalgia. Back several years ago, prior to the emergence of OS X, there was a widely used, widely popular and widely supported Apple program called HyperCard. It made its appearance in the late '80s and I was one of its biggest advocates. For several years, though a licensed architect, I made my living creating HyperCard stacks of a highly sophisticated nature. This was in the era of the Mac SE30 with its dinky little black and white 9-inch screen, and a 16 MHz processor without a built-in hard drive. HyperCard and my programs ran off of 3.5 inch floppy disks.

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