Mac


Shopping for Macs at Thrift Stores

  Eric Buczynski       January 25, 2007

If you’re like me and don’t feel the need to have the latest-and-greatest Mac equipment, the best thing you can do for your Mac and your wallet is shop at thrift stores. It’s a crap shoot, but on a good day you may walk out with more than you expected. There are a variety of stores to select from, including the Salvation Army, The Goodwill, American Thrift Centers, and my personal favorite: The Red, White and Blue thrift store.

Introduction to the OS X Terminal Application

  Wayne Linder       January 22, 2007

The Terminal is an application from Apple used to gain access to the power that is “under the hood” of the operating system. Historically, there have been two ways to access the operating system; a Graphical User Interface (GUI) shell, or a command-line shell. The Mac OS graphical interface allows us to do our daily computing tasks in a manner that is familiar to us – if we want to throw an item away, we drag it to the trash.

Finding Mac Freeware and Shareware: A Beginner's Guide

  Wayne Linder       January 18, 2007

Why would anyone need low-cost software? I’m sure that some people, after switching from the PC, realize that they need some software to put on their shiny new Mac and their pockets are now empty. Or how about students, who, after spending their last bit of pocket change on some yummy ramen noodles, don’t exactly have a few hundred dollars left for a graphic-editing application. Then you have people like me.

Introducing Revolution: The New HyperCard

  Joe Wilkins       January 16, 2007

First a little nostalgia. Back several years ago, prior to the emergence of OS X, there was a widely used, widely popular and widely supported Apple program called HyperCard. It made its appearance in the late ’80s and I was one of its biggest advocates. For several years, though a licensed architect, I made my living creating HyperCard stacks of a highly sophisticated nature. This was in the era of the Mac SE30 with its dinky little black and white 9-inch screen, and a 16 MHz processor without a built-in hard drive.



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